Thursday, November 4, 2010

Cone 6 Oxidation results Group 3

Cone 6 Oxidation results Group 3
by Terry Rorison

To see explanation and Group 1, click on the link below:
 http://wpapotters.blogspot.com/2010/11/cone-6-oxidation-results-group-1.html

To see Group 2 results, click on the link below: 
http://wpapotters.blogspot.com/2010/11/cone-6-oxidation-results-group-2.html


118
118 Transparent - BG1 C/6 Gold/Brown




Minspar (was F-4 or Soda Feldspar) 0.45

EPK 0.06

Bentonite 0.02

Whiting 0.17

Zinc Oxide 0.05

Silica 0.25

Dolomite 0.125

Red Iron Oxide 0.08
119
119 Transparent - T12 C/6  Tan




Potash Spar 0.44

EPK 0.06

Bentonite 0.02

Lithium Carb 0.04

Whiting 0.14

Zinc Oxide 0.05

Silica 0.24

Black Iron Oxide 0.02
120
120 Transparent - T12 C/6 Reddish Tan




Potash Spar 0.44

EPK 0.06

Bentonite 0.02

Lithium Carb 0.04

Whiting 0.14

Zinc Oxide 0.05

Silica 0.24

Black Iron Oxide 0.04
121
121 Transparent - T12 C/6 Almost Black




Potash Spar 0.44

EPK 0.06

Bentonite 0.02

Lithium Carb 0.04

Whiting 0.14

Zinc Oxide 0.05

Silica 0.24

Black Iron Oxide 0.12
122
122 Transparent - T12 C/6 Reddish Brown




Potash Spar 0.44

EPK 0.06

Bentonite 0.02

Lithium Carb 0.04

Whiting 0.14

Zinc Oxide 0.05

Silica 0.24

Red Iron Oxide 0.06

Titanium Dioxide 0.025
124
124 GA 5 Cone 6 Straw




Frit 3134 0.279

EPK 0.219

Dolomite 0.129

Lithium Carb 0.035

Whiting 0.04

Flint 0.298

Copper Carb 0.025

Red iron oxide 0.02
125
 
125 GA 8 Cone 6 Green Breaking Ochre




Volcanic Ash 0.413

Gilespie Borate 0.231

Frit  3134 0.097

EPK 0.077

Bentonite 0.006

Lithium Carb 0.012

Dolomite 0.045

Whiting 0.014

Flint 0.105

Copper  Carb 0.009

Red iron oxide 0.007

Tin Oxide 0.045
129
129 GA 20 Cone 6 Lewings SC40E Blue Gray




Custer Spar 0.223

EPK 0.099

Bentonite  0.031

Frit  3134 0.27

Dolomite 0.036

Whiting 0.118

Silica 0.223

Mason stain #6616 0.06
130
130 GA 20 Cone 6 Lewings SC40E Red




Custer Spar 0.223

EPK 0.099

Bentonite  0.031

Frit  3134 0.27

Dolomite 0.036

Whiting 0.118

Silica 0.223

Red Stain Standard Ceramic #487 0.08
131
131 GA 20 Cone 6 Lewings SC40E Blue




Custer Spar 0.223

EPK 0.099

Bentonite  0.031

Frit  3134 0.27

Dolomite 0.036

Whiting 0.118

Silica 0.223

Cobalt Carb 0.01

Rutile 0.02
133
133 Temmoku Sugar Maples Cone 6




Custer Spar 0.45

Silica 0.27

Whiting 0.17

EPK 0.11

Gillespie Borate 0.05

Red Iron Oxide 0.1

Bentonite 0.02
134
134 Gloria's Dark Green Cone 6 Sugar Maples




Neph Syenite 0.3123

Wollastonite 0.2085

Gillespie Borate 0.1044

Strontium Carb 0.248

Copper Carb 0.0817

Zircopax 0.0817

Bentonite 0.02
 135
135 Blue Spruce Cone 6 Sugar Maples




Minspar 0.45

Gillespie Borate 0.1

Dolomite 0.12

Talc 0.12

EPK 0.08

Silica 0.16

Cobalt Carb 0.02

Copper Carb 0.02

Rutile 0.05

Bentonite 0.02

136
136 Nutmeg Shino Cone 6 Sugar Maples




Dolomite 0.233

Spodumene 0.233

Frit 3134 0.068

OM4 Ball Clay 0.233

Silica 0.233

Red iron oxide 0.0107

Yellow Ochre 0.0324

Tin Oxide 0.0485
137
137 Oribe Green Cone 6 Sugar Maples




Custer Spar 0.32

Whiting 0.24

Silica 0.24

EPK 0.12

Zinc Oxide 0.08

Copper Carb 0.05
138
138 Faux Celedon Cone 6 Sugar Maples




Minspar 0.41

Silica 0.19

Zircopax 0.12

Whiting 0.07

Dolomite 0.05

Zinc Oxide 0.02

Tenn. Ball Clay 0.01

Copper Carb 0.025
141
141 Hansen Clear GA12 Cone 6 Mottled blue




Custer Spar 0.2

Frit 3134 0.2

EPK 0.2

Wollastonite 0.2

Silica 0.2

Rutile 0.05

Cobalt Oxide 0.002
































20 comments:

  1. Incredibly gorgeous results, thanks for sharing all your hard work! I'm speechless, my heart and head both full of wonder!

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  2. Thanks for the nice comments. I assume you have seen the recent results (Groups 5-8) that utilized controlled cooling? Thanks, again. Terry

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    Replies
    1. I am having trouble understanding the measuring system for glaze components. How do you figure 0.234 into grams. Move the decimal over so it reads 2.34? Sorry I'm new at this. Glazes are beautiful.

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    2. 0.234 is the decimal equivalent to 23.4%. To convert the formula into grams multiple 0.234 times the total number of grams in the batch you are making. Thus, if a 1000 gram batch, then 1000 times 0.234 = 234 grams of this material. If a 500 gram total batch, then 500 times 0.234 = 117 grams. You do this with each material in the glaze and if calculated properly, you should have a total of 500 grams of glaze. Does this make sense to you?

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    3. Thanks so much. I think I get it.

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  3. Hi Terry,
    Thanks for the excellent glaze postings, very generous of you to devote the time to it.

    Number 118 adds to 1.075 , and number 122 to .9 (both excluding oxides).

    (Would have emailed you but the webform keeps rejecting my address as invalid)

    All the best, Graham.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Graham.
      Did you ever get a reply about the .9 number 122 recipe??? I'm trying to chose some recipes for college, which we have to do some changes to, to learn about mixing/changing glazes.
      But I'm concerned with this not adding to 100%, & I thought it a nice one to try.
      Please let me know
      Tsnia

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  4. Graham, Others may disagree but as long as the ingredients are kept in the same proportion it does not matter if they don't add up to 100% for any particular glase. That is assuming that there are no missing ingredients. I try to be careful but mistakes still happen. I'll look at both and report back. Email is terry dot rorison at gmail dot com. Disguised to prevent spam. Thanks for your comments. Terry

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  5. Hi there....thanks again for the great recipes. I recently made the Shino Nutmeg here and it comes out brown...fired to 2232 with a normal cool. Any ideas?

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  6. Many of these were fired with a cooling cycle from 1900 F to about 1500 F - about 100 degrees per hour. I also glazed the samples with one dip, let dry, and second dip half-way down from the top. Clay body can also make a difference too. Somewhere in the blog is the firing schedule and clay body recipe. I'll post the links.

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  7. Thank Terry...i use a white porcelain, it's actually Wayne Higby's scraps that I mix into a throwing body. I will try the cooling cycle.

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  8. What you have as nutmeg looks absolutely nothing like the recipe. It looks more like a glaze with a great deal of rutile in it. Much like a glaze called Speckle Orange. It is not really a glaze but a wash. Rutile 18; Gerstley 59; Talc 41;

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  9. Hi Graham (or anyone that has the answer).
    Did you ever get a reply about the 99% number 122 recipe??? I'm trying to chose some recipes for college, which we have to do some changes to, to learn about mixing/changing glazes.
    But I'm concerned with this not adding to 100%, & I thought it a nice one to try.
    Please let me know
    Tania

    ReplyDelete
  10. Tania and all, It is the ratio that is important not the adding up to a 100%. However I will recompute the formula so that it does and post the results in the comments section. Should be done by tomorrow. All the best, Terry

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  11. Potash Spar 0.42
    EPK 0.06
    Bentonite 0.02
    Lithium Carb 0.02
    Whiting 0.13
    Zinc Oxide 0.05
    Silica 0.23
    Red Iron Oxide 0.06
    Titanium Dioxide 0.02

    Total = 1.00 or 100%

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  12. So, 118 is awesome and I want to test it out. By chance does anyone know if its food safe?

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  13. Hi Terry, Thanks for your posting !!!!!. Vos can you tell me. What is the EPK?

    ReplyDelete
  14. Hi Terry, Thanks for your posting !!!!!. Vos can you tell me. What is the EPK?

    ReplyDelete